Meet our potters at our potters reception.

Meet our potters at our potters reception.

Pottery Showcase

As ceramic artists, each of us utilizes different clay bodies, glaze applications, and firing techniques. Some of the pieces available are hand built, stamped, and molded. Our other ceramicists work at the potter’s wheel, and throw bowls, vases, plates, mugs, and dishes.

Demonstrations will include work on a potters wheel and molded techniques. A gallery sale will include pottery seconds at 50% Off. Free raffle. Meet our potters reception with food and beverages.

Sale 11am to 5pm. Demonstrations 1pm to 3pm. Reception 4pm to 6pm.

Handbuilding

"Handbuilding" is working with clay by hand using only simple tools, not the pottery wheel. Before potters had the wheel, they were creating beautiful pots and clay forms using clay, their hands and fingers, and basic hand tools. Below are the three most common forms of creating hand built pots: pinchpot, coiling and slab techniques.

Pinch Pots: Begin a pinch pot by forming a lump of clay into a smooth sphere that fits the size of the hand. This method is similar to the way the Native Americans shaped clay into useful pots.

Coiling: Coils of clay can be used to build bowls, vases and other forms in various shapes and sizes.  Coils may be pressed with the fingers or a tool on both the inside and outside to create interesting texture.

Slab Method: Is a method of pottery in which a thick, flat plate, or slice, of clay is cut into shapes which are joined to form an object. The joined edges are scored and slip is used.  Slip-Clay diluted with water to the consistency of cream, used for joining pieces of clay.

 

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Camille S. Hoffman -  Raku/pit fired ceramics

Camille S. Hoffman -  Raku/pit fired ceramics

Pit Firing

Pit firing is the original method for “baking” clay.  It dates back nearly 30,000 years ago.  This process is done typically in a hole in the ground, or a pit, pots are placed in the pit and burned.  Pit firing is an atmospheric process all of the colors and patterns are derived from the process and what is consume in the fire.  Items that are burned will turn to vapor and will swirl around the pieces in the pit.  If the pieces are hot enough to have their pores open the colored vapor will enter the pore and stay there, if not pot will not have color besides black, gray, or white.


There are many things that will produce colors. Some ceramist use a combination of copper, salt, iron is key to getting colors in the pit. You can place colorants in the bedding, around each piece, on top of each piece, or even throw it at the pieces during the firing.Each can result in different effects in the coloration. When you bury the colorant, it will add color late in the firing. If you place in around or on the piece it will color in the middle of the firing. When you throw it in you can get instant coloring much like a star burst pattern.

Randy Snyder Raku Firing

Randy Snyder Raku Firing

Randy Snyder Raku Firing

Randy Snyder Raku Firing

Raku

Each piece of my pottery is wheel thrown or hand formed and fired in a technique called RAKU, developed in 16th century Japan. The clay pieces are rapidly fired to 1,700oF, then pulled from the fire and placed in a covered container of combustible material. This atmosphere gives the piece its unique characteristics. It blackens the clay and gives the glazes their metallic iridescence or crackle patterns. The outcome is an unique and unpredictable mark of the fire. No two pieces are the same.

Freely translated, RAKU means enjoyment, contentment, pleasure and happiness.
Because of the porous clay used and the crackle finish, RAKU ware will “sweat.” All my vases have been sealed. When using for flowers, place on a trivet or coaster. Avoid direct sun light as this will affect the stability of the lustrous surface.
-Randy Snyder